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about amanda

 

birth keeper. space traveller.

thread spinner. veil walker.

moon watcher.

roots. wings.

witness.

I live and homestead with my partner and her son in the Slocan Valley, Sinixt Territory of British Columbia. I'm an acadian/irish settler born in southern New Brunswick on Mi'kmaq and Wolastoq territory and have lived in the West Kootenays for the past 10 years.

As a queer fat femme and reproductive health and birth advocate I am no stranger to the felt impacts of living in a world where our bodies become the frontlines of conflict, confusion, and control. 

My work is my work.  

It is with imperfection, awareness, and a great deal of empathy that I come as a practitioner, offering an open space to listen and explore the possibility for resource and health to express in your system, gently turning a lens to each moment of expression, as an opportunity to engage with the creative organizing forces that live in our cells. 

I have been working for close to 10 years as a doula and reproductive health advocate. In the past 2 years I've been training with Body Intelligence, and received registered cranio sacral practitioner status in September 2018. I attended The Matrona Quantum Midwifery program in 2012-13 and prior to this, apprenticed with several community midwife elders locally and internationally, and with birth itself.  I was one of the founding members Kootenay Doula Groups's barrier-free birth support program, as well as on the board of advisors for SQUAT Birth Journal. For several years, I facilitated an in-person weekly birth study group as well as offered workshops in DIY Placenta Medicine making. In the past couple years, I've taken my facilitation work online and co-facilitate a childbirth education series for trans* and queer folks called Birthing Beyond the Binary. I am currently working towards a degree in Nursing from Selkirk College.

Amanda Phoenix

“Contrary to what we may have been taught to think, unnecessary and unchosen suffering wounds us but need not scar us for life. It does mark us. What we allow the mark of our suffering to become is in our own hands.”
— bell hooks, All About Love: New Visions